Info
Category:
Richest BusinessExecutives
Net Worth:
$6 Million
Birthdate:
Jan 9, 1972 (52 years old)
Birthplace:
Reading
Gender:
Female
Height:
5 ft 4 in (1.65 m)
Profession:
Presenter, Real estate development, Businessperson
Nationality:
United Kingdom
💰 Compare Sarah Beeny's Net Worth
Table of ContentsExpand
  1. Early Life
  2. Career
  3. Personal Life

What is Sarah Beeny's Net Worth?

Sarah Beeny is an English property developer and television presenter who has a net worth of $6 million. Sarah Beeny is best known for presenting a number of popular shows in the United Kingdom like "Property Ladder," "Sarah Beeny's New Life in the Country," and "Property Snakes and Ladders," among others.

Early Life

Sarah Beeny was born on January 9, 1972 in Reading, Berkshire, England to parents Richard and Ann Beeny. Her father worked as an architect for Bovis Homes. She grew up with her older brother. The family lived in two converted brick cottages on a plot on the edge of the Duke of Wellington's estate at Stratfield Saye in Hampshire. When she was 10 years old, her mother died of breast cancer. She then was sent to the all-girls Luckley-Oakfield School in Wokingham. Beeny enjoyed the dramatic arts while in high school. She studied drama at Queen Mary's College but ultimately did not get into drama school. After travelling solo around the world as a teenager, she returned to the UK and worked a number of odd jobs. She worked for Save the Children, cleaned windows, sold vacuums, and started a sandwich making business. She also began studying the property market and eventually started her own property developing business along with her brother and husband.

Career

While at a bachelorette party, Beeny met a family member of a talent hunter at Talkback Thames, a production company. She was asked to participate in a screen test for a new television series about property development. She ultimately landed the role of host on the show "Property Ladder" in 2001. She remained on the show until 2009. The show follows the journeys of amateur property developers as they pursue a new career in renovating houses. The show was quite successful and led to a number of spin-off series like "Property Snakes and Ladders," which Beeny also hosted, "Britain's Best Home" and "Streets Ahead."

In 2006, Beeny began presenting the show "One Year to Pay Off Your Mortgage." She also wrote a number of books to accompany the series and a weekly column for "Mail on Sunday," a print publication. In August 2010, she began hosting the Channel 4 program "Help! My House is Falling Down." The same year, she also presented "Beeny's Restoration Nightmare" in which she renovated Rise Hall, a historic house near Rise, East of Yorkshire, in order to create a wedding venue. The following year, she began presenting a new series for BBC titled "Village SOS," which follows a group of inhabitants of a village as they seek to restore their village to its former glory.

In 2012, Beeny began hosting "Double Your House for Half the Money." The series ran for three seasons. In 2014, she presented "Sarah Beeny's How to Sell Your Home." In 2017, she began presenting "Live Mortgage Free with Sarah Beeny." The following year, she began her podcast, "At Home with Sarah Beeny." On the podcast, she chats with famous people who allow Beeny into their homes and talk about their personal lives.

Beginning in 2020, Beeny has been featured in "Sarah Beeny's New Life in the Country." The show follows her family's move from London to Somerset and the building of their dream home. The third season of the show began in 2023. In June 2022, the show "Sarah Beeny's Little House Big Plans" premiered on Channel 4. In May 2023, she began presenting a new show called "Sarah Beeny's New Country Lives" in which she follows the lives of city dwellers who give up their city lives in order to resettle in the countryside.

(Photo by Dave M. Benett/WireImage)

Personal Life

When Beeny was 18 years old, she met her future husband, Graham Swift. Her brother is married to Swift's sister, Caroline. They have four sons.

They lived in Streatham before buying a property in the East Riding of Yorkshire in 2001. They spent years renovating the property before selling it for around three times the amount they bought it for in 2019. They then moved to the Somerset countryside area. Beeny's husband and four sons share a love of music. In 2022, they formed the rock band, The Entitled Sons. Their first single, "Break," was released at the beginning of 2022 and made it into the top 10 on the iTunes rock charts. In early 2023, the band won the Pilton Stage Competition and performed at the 2023 Glastonbury Festival.

In August 2022, Beeny revealed that she had breast cancer and would be undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Channel 4 announced that they had commissioned a documentary to follow Beeny and her family as she went through cancer treatment. In April 2023, Beeny confirmed that the doctors had given her the all clear and she was cancer free. A few months later, in June, her documentary film "Sarah Beeny vs Cancer" aired on Channel 4. The film documented her journey with cancer from diagnosis through treatment and mastectomy. The film received praise for its honesty.

Even before her cancer diagnosis, Beeny has devoted her time and money to charitable causes related to cancer research. She has been a supporter of Brain Tumour Research, a UK-based cancer charity that raises awareness of brain tumors specifically. Additionally, Beeny is a supporter of the group Cardboard Citizens, the UK's only professional theatre company that is comprised of homeless people.

All net worths are calculated using data drawn from public sources. When provided, we also incorporate private tips and feedback received from the celebrities or their representatives. While we work diligently to ensure that our numbers are as accurate as possible, unless otherwise indicated they are only estimates. We welcome all corrections and feedback using the button below.
Did we make a mistake?
Submit a correction suggestion and help us fix it!
Submit a Correction