Horace Grant Net Worth

Horace Grant Net Worth:
$35 Million

What is Horace Grant's Net Worth?

Horace Grant is a retired American basketball player who has a net worth of $35 million. Although he now serves as a special advisor to the president and COO of the Chicago Bulls, Grant is probably best known for his playing career in the NBA. After playing college ball at Clemson University, Horace played for teams like the Chicago Bulls and the Los Angeles Lakers, winning four NBA championships over the course of his career.

He also played for teams like the Orlando Magic and the Seattle Supersonics. He eventually retired in 2004 after a playing career that began back in 1987. A power forward, Grant won All-Star honors in 1994 and NBA All-Defensive Second Team honors four times. He is also the twin brother of Harvey Grant.

Early Life

Horace Junior Grant Sr. was born on July 4th of 1965 in Augusta, Georgia. Raised alongside his twin brother Harvey, Horace and his family members would turn out to be heavily athletic. Harvey played for 11 seasons in the NBA with teams like the Washington Wizards, the Portland Trail Blazers, and the Philadelphia 76ers. Three of Horace's nephews eventually became NBA players as well. Horace and Harvey grew up in Mitchell, Georgia, while attending high school in Sparta, Georgia.

After graduating, Grant attended Clemson University and achieved considerable feats with the Clemson Tigers basketball team. He was the first player in ACC history to lead the league in scoring, rebounding, and field goals. By 1987, he has led the Tigers to the NCAA Tournament while winning the ACC Player of the Year Award. He was also given first-team All-ACC honors. Grant was the first Clemson player to win ACC Player of the Year.

Career

Grant began his NBA career after being drafted by the Chicago Bulls in 1987. He and Scottie Pippen teamed up to create a strong offense, and Horace had won a starting position by 1988. He, Pippen, and Jordan formed an excellent trio while Horace also contributed notably to the team's defensive efforts. During the next few years, Grant and the Bulls would win three consecutive NBA championships from 1991 to 1993.

During this period, he became known for wearing goggles during games due to his myopia. Despite receiving LASIK eye surgery to fix his vision, Grant continued to wear goggles to serve as a source of inspiration for visually-impaired children. Jordan eventually retired after the 1992-93 season, leaving Horace as one of the Bull's most important players. In 1994, he played in the NBA All-Star Game for the first and only time.

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In 1994, Horace left the Bulls as a free agent and was quickly snapped up by the Orlando Magic. He joined players such as Shaquille O'Neal and Penny Hardaway and spent five years in Orlando. During the 1999-2000 season, Grant played for the Seattle Supersonics. After just one year, he moved to the Los Angeles Lakers, where he played for another single season. Although his time with the Lakers was brief, Grant won another NBA championship with the team.

He then moved back to the Orlando Magic, but that proved to be a bad decision. He was cut from the team in 2002 after his coach Don Rivers claimed that he interfered with the team – even referring to the power forward as a "cancer." After this incident, Grant chose to retire, although he spent a brief period with the Lakers once again in the 2003-2004 season.

Salary and Career Earnings

During his professional career, Horace earned $68 million in salary alone. His highest-paid seasons came in 1996 and 1998 when he earned $14.8 and $14.3 million in base salary, respectively. This is equivalent to approximately $23 million per season in today's dollars.

The Jordan Rules

It is widely rumored that Grant provided much of the source material for the controversial book, "The Jordan Rules," written by Sam Smith. The book is seen as controversial because of the unflattering depiction of Michael Jordan. It also sheds light on infighting within the Chicago Bulls, and it even tells an account of Jordan punching a fellow teammate. The book was largely dismissed as fictional by members of the Chicago Bulls.

Real Estate

In 2016, it was reported that a home once owned by Horace Grant had been listed for $11.9 million. The residence is situated in the Orlando neighborhood of Winter Park, and it features a number of amenities. These include a waterfall, a bar, seven bedrooms, and much more. At the time, the home was the most expensive property on sale in Central Florida. Grant originally purchased the raw land for just $1.3 million in 1995.

Construction of the home was then completed in 2000, and Horace sold the property just four years later. He managed to offload it for $5 million, giving him a seven-figure profit margin for this real estate deal. After the new buyer acquired the property, he improved it even further with a ballroom, and a kitchen big enough to accommodate 200 guests. It now spans 17,649 square feet.

In 2020, it was reported that Horace Grant had listed a property in California's Central Coast area for $1.699 million. The five-bedroom home spans over 4,200 square feet of living space and is situated in a gated community near Pismo Beach. It also sits on five acres of land in the Arroyo Grande region and offers exceptional views of the surrounding mountains. Outside, there is a stone patio, an outdoor fireplace, a playground, and a sports court. He originally purchased the home over a decade prior for $1.389 million, which means that he stands to make an extremely modest profit from this real estate deal.

Horace Grant Net Worth

Horace Grant

Net Worth:$35 Million
Date of Birth:Jul 4, 1965 (57 years old)
Gender:Male
Height:6 ft 9 in (2.08 m)
Profession:Basketball player
Nationality:United States of America
All net worths are calculated using data drawn from public sources. When provided, we also incorporate private tips and feedback received from the celebrities or their representatives. While we work diligently to ensure that our numbers are as accurate as possible, unless otherwise indicated they are only estimates. We welcome all corrections and feedback using the button below.
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