The 10 Most Expensive Desserts In The World

By on February 20, 2012 in ArticlesEntertainment

Dessert might not be the most important meal of the day, but it sure is the most enjoyable. So why not indulge yourself and order something really extraordinary next time? With that in mind, here are the world's 10 most expensive desserts, ideal for someone with a sweet tooth and a fat wallet.

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10. La Madeline au Truffle, $250

Located in Norwalk, Connecticut, Knipschildt Chocolatier is the mastermind behind this decadent single truffle that's made with vanilla, truffle oil, sugar, heavy cream, and 70% Valrhona dark chocolate packaged in an exquisite golden box.

9. Beyond Gourmet Jelly Beans, $500

David Klein, the creator of Jelly Belly, dreamt up these special jelly beans that are totally free of artificial colors and flavors and coated in 24-karat gold leaf. The candies, which come in dozens of flavors, are packaged in a beautiful crystal jar.

8. Golden Opulence Sundae, $1,000

For its 50th anniversary, New York City's Serendipity 3 created this masterpiece sundae, which includes Grand Passion Caviar, chocolate truffles, and Tahitian vanilla bean ice cream dusted in 23-karat edible gold leaf.  Customers also get to take home the $350 Baccarat goblet that the dessert is served in.

7. The Golden Phoenix Cupcake, $1,000

Cupcake lovers can find this treat at small bakery named Bloomsbury's located inside the Dubai Mall. Its ingredients include Ugandan vanilla beans, Italian chocolate, gold-dipped strawberries, and icing dusted in edible gold.

6. Krispy Kreme's Luxe Doughnut, $1,685

Four years ago, Krispy Kreme debuted a pricey doughnut for a limited time to raise funds for The Children's Trust. Served along with a cocktail, this doughnut was covered with 24-karat gold leaf and even included a few edible diamonds. It was also topped off with a white chocolate lotus and its stuffing was made of Dom Pérignon champagne jelly.

5. Frrrozen Haute Chocolate Ice Cream Sundae, $25,000

Another impressive product from Serendipity 3, this sundae contains five grams of 23-carat edible gold and its topping is the $250 La Madeline au Truffle. (Woah!) Diners enjoy their ice cream from a goblet with a gold crown and a golden spoon, and even receive an 18-karat gold bracelet with one carat of white diamonds.

4. The Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel Chocolate Pudding, $34,000

The most expensive chocolate pudding in the world is the brainchild of Chef Marc Guibert at England;s Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel in England. It includes a replica of a Faberge egg, edible gold, caviar, and delicious chocolates. Not to mention, a inedible two-carat diamond. The hotel requires three weeks notice and a down payment to try this opulent dessert.

3. The Absurdity Sundae, $60,000

This dessert is all about the experience. For $60,000, dessert lovers will be flown first class to Tanzania's Mount Kilimanjaro. Once at the mountain, a chef will create the ice cream using the summit's glacial ice. The sundae itself costs $3,333.33, due to the bananas and syrups produced from rare wines. Plus, a cellist will play soothing music as you enjoy the delectable fare.

2. Diamond Fruitcake, $1.72 million

The Takashimaya Department Store in Tokyo took holiday grandeur to a whole new level by commissioning special cake for one of its displays. Embellished with more than 220 diamonds (a total weight of 170 carats), the masterpiece took six months to design and one month to make it.

1. Strawberries Arnaud, $9.85 million

Created as special addition to its 2016 Valentine's Day menu, Arnaud's Restaurant in New Orleans put an over-the-top spin on the strawberry dessert, which typically costs less than $10. The dessert's ingredients include 24-karat gold flake toppings, whipped cream, vanilla ice cream, and a variety of expensive champagnes and liquors. The lofty price tag is also due to the 10.06-carat royal blue diamond engagement ring that the meal comes with.

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